Last edited by Gorr
Wednesday, July 29, 2020 | History

3 edition of Vessel operations under flags of convenience and their implications on national security found in the catalog.

Vessel operations under flags of convenience and their implications on national security

United States. Congress. House. Committee on Armed Services. Special Oversight Panel on the Merchant Marine

Vessel operations under flags of convenience and their implications on national security

hearing before the Special Oversight Panel on the Merchant Marine of the Committee on Armed Services, House of Representatives, One Hundred Seventh Congress, second session, hearing held June 13, 2002

by United States. Congress. House. Committee on Armed Services. Special Oversight Panel on the Merchant Marine

  • 95 Want to read
  • 20 Currently reading

Published by U.S. G.P.O., For sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O. [Congressional Sales Office] in Washington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Flags of convenience -- United States,
  • Shipping -- Security measures -- United States,
  • National security -- United States,
  • International trade

  • The Physical Object
    Paginationiv, 174 p. :
    Number of Pages174
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15539367M
    ISBN 100160705061
    OCLC/WorldCa52861154

      An agreement executed between the responsible Vessel and Facility Security Officer, or between Vessel Security Officers in the case of a vessel-to-vessel activity, that provides a means for.   According to the Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA), 90% of cruises fly under a non-American flag. CLIA maintains that there are numerous reasons why ships would choose to sail under flags that are not their own, including taxes, reputation, and a nation’s ability to offer certain requested services if assistance is needed at any time.

      Interestingly, had the vessel been registered under the Norwegian flag, stranding the crew in a foreign port without pay would have been illegal under Norwegian maritime law. In my opinion, flags of convenience are the worst thing that has ever happened to the global maritime community. I think that they should be eliminated and made illegal.   MOL Pride, owned and operated by the Japanese company Mitsui O.S.K. Lines, flying the flag of Liberia and home-ported in its capital, Monrovia. MV Mainport Pine, a seismic support vessel owned by Irish company Mainport Group, flies the flag of the Marshall Islands and bears the home port of Majuro.. Flag of convenience (FOC) is a business practice whereby a ship's owners register a .

    FOC Flag of Convenience the flag State under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea – It gained importance as vessels began distancing more and more from their homeport. Abstract. Although frequently ignored in discussion of ocean security, fisheries have had central security implications throughout history. This article re-centres fisheries issues as both a cause and effect of security conflicts, and examines the implications of this re-framing for addressing this intersection.


Share this book
You might also like
Adventures in American literature

Adventures in American literature

Philosophy in poetry

Philosophy in poetry

Memoirs of a freedom fighter

Memoirs of a freedom fighter

Eco-innovation

Eco-innovation

Music in Ancient Israel

Music in Ancient Israel

Seebohm across three decades

Seebohm across three decades

Broken vows

Broken vows

Society and religion in early Ottoman Egypt

Society and religion in early Ottoman Egypt

new proposed revisions to OMB Circular A-122

new proposed revisions to OMB Circular A-122

Population Environment Relations in Tropical Island: The Case of Eastern Fiji (Mab Technical Notes Series : No 13)

Population Environment Relations in Tropical Island: The Case of Eastern Fiji (Mab Technical Notes Series : No 13)

Visualizing music notation.

Visualizing music notation.

The story of a lie

The story of a lie

Teaching American English pronunciation

Teaching American English pronunciation

Vessel operations under flags of convenience and their implications on national security by United States. Congress. House. Committee on Armed Services. Special Oversight Panel on the Merchant Marine Download PDF EPUB FB2

vessel operations under flags of convenience and their implications on national security hearing before the special oversight panel on the merchant marine of the committee on armed services house of representatives one hundred seventh congress second session hearing held j page 2 prev page top of doc congress.#   Get this from a library.

Vessel operations under flags of convenience and their implications on national security: hearing before the Special Oversight Panel on the Merchant Marine of the Committee on Armed Services, House of Representatives, One Hundred Seventh Congress, second session, hearing held J [United States.

Congress. Flag of convenience (FOC) is a business practice whereby a ship's owners register a merchant ship in a ship register of a country other than that of the ship's owners, and the ship flies the civil ensign of that country, called the flag state.

The term is often used pejoratively, and although common, the practice is sometimes regarded as contentious. Each merchant ship is required by. click to get hearing text. Consequently, the ship owners take advantage of the inability of the flag of convenience to govern its own ships, which compromises important maritime safety and security : Hamad Hamad.

Vessels registered under flags of convenience can often cut operating costs or avoid the regulations of the owner's country. To achieve that, a ship owner will find a country with an open registry, or a nation that allows registration of vessels owned by foreign entities.

Southeast Asia and Bangladesh are at present global hot spots of pirate attacks on merchant vessels and fishing boats. This book explains why, and in what form, piracy still exists. It offers an integrated analysis of the root causes of piracy, linking declining fish stocks, organized crime networks, radical politically motivated groups, the use of flags of convenience, the lack of state.

31 Statement of Congressman Frank Wolf before the House Armed Services Committee Special Oversight Panel on the Merchant Marine Vessel Operations under "Flags of Convenience" and National Security.

See, for example Vessel Operations Under Flags of Convenience and Their Implications on National Security: Hearing Before the Special Oversight Panel on the Merchant Marine of the Committee on Armed Services, US House of Representatives, th Congress, 2nd Session, Hearing Held JVol –; Tommy Piemonte and Stefanie.

Ships registered under flags of convenience can often reduce operating costs or avoid the regulations of the owner's country. To do so, a vessel owner will find a nation with an open registry, or a nation that allows registration of vessels owned by foreign entities. Flags of Convenience vessels are becoming a common sight in modern maritime and spreads across popular vessel categories ranging from cargo carriers and tugs to cruise ships; adopted by commercial vessel operators as well as illegal syndicates dealing, as reported before in human, drug trafficking.

A flag state is the country or governmental entity under whose laws a vessel is registered or licensed. This can be the country in which the owner resides, or more commonly in the superyacht world, an offshore ship registry in a country with laws that are attuned to the complexities of yacht ownership and charter operations.

Flags of Convenience and Their Effect on NATO Merchant Marine Manning by Dorothy Lou Tate Lieutenant, United States Navy B.A., Old Dominion University, Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MANAGEMENT from the NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL December ABSTRACT This paper is a study of.

Bolivia has 5 foreign owned vessels under its flag, and Mongolia has 44 foreign owned vessels registered. The Marshall Islands has over vessels registered to its flag, making it the seventh largest merchant fleet in the world.

Of these, over are foreign-owned. THE ROLE OF THE FLAG STATE IN VESSEL & SEA SAFETY AND MARINE SECURITY Published on J J • 23 Likes • 7 Comments. The tight economic noose around North Korea is being weakened by the regime’s use of flags of convenience by sanctions-evading ships., The US Treasury announced last month its ‘largest North Korea-related sanctions tranche to date’, which included 56 firms and vessels with links to Pyongyang, all of which are subject to asset freeze and remain prohibited from dealing with Americans.

vessel is flying a flag of convenience, she is most likely flying the flag of a country other than her origin and most certainly different from her owner’s. The term flag of convenience, as noted in the introduction, is a customary layman’s term for a vessel’s flag when.

Most merchant ships flying Panama's flag belong to foreign owners wishing to avoid the stricter marine regulations imposed by their own countries. Panama operates what. Flags of Convenience * As long ago asthe Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)defined Flags of Convenience as: "the flags of such countries as Panama, Liberia, Honduras and Costa Rica whose laws allow —and indeed,make it easy for —ships owned by foreign nationals or companies to fly these flags.

The Cambodian register has been among the most notorious flag of convenience operations in recent years - so notorious that the government in Phnom Penh - under pressure from the U.S.

and the European Union - decided to terminate its contract last September after a series of scandals involving some of the more than 1, Cambodian-flagged ships. The term ‘flag of convenience’ became common in the s following the campaigning of the International Transport Workers' Federation (ITF) against FoCs at the ITF Congress in Oslo [6,7].

Nevertheless, the practice of flagging one's vessel under a foreign flag .Vessel Operations Under Flags of Convenience and Their Implications on National Security: Hearing Before the Special Oversight Panel on the Merchant Marine, House Comm.

On Armed Services, th Cong., 2d Sess. RUSI’s Andrea Berger investigates the networks of two Singaporean families and their companies to illuminate longstanding relationships and continued business ties with North Korea. While greater evidence is needed, past violations, company and ship registries, and access to flags of convenience point to a greater need for vigilance in monitoring sanctioned North Korean entities and .